About me and this blog

The theme of my blog is “My Life My Work My Country” and so the entry here are my stories as I get on with my life in this country.

Nation comes from the latin word, nascere, which means “to be born”.

Hence a nation is nothing but a collection of natives and the story of a nation is a sum-total of the stories of ordinary beings who are born and inhabit a place we call home for a short period of time. In this period, we leave our personal stories which then becomes the story of a nation.

This blog is about Bhutan and this blog is also non-political and non-religious.

About me

                Engineer, communication scholar and educator – and passionate about dogs, airplanes, coffee and travelling

               

                I come from Trashigang – the eastern-most district in Bhutan. I am a Sharchop. My father was a bus driver and my mother a house wife. Both didn’t attend school – thus making me the first generation to go to school – in the family and in the country too.

                I graduated with laurea cum laude (distinction) in electronics engineering from the University of Bologna in Italy in 1995. I worked as the chief engineer for the Bhutan Broadcasting Service – leading the teams that brought both the FM radio services and television to Bhutan between 1997 and 1999. Subsequently, I made a career shift and moved to documentary filmmaking (following my passion), where I won three major international awards and several nominations. My best-known works are School Among Glaciers, Rocking the Himalayan Kingdom-Blof in Bhutan and Long Walk to Education.

                From 2009 to 2013, I served as the communications director and spokesperson for the Royal Family of Bhutan.

                As a third career, I have opted teaching and research. I taught in the Royal University of Bhutan as adjunct professor and briefly served as a dean at the Royal Thimphu College. I am, currently, pursuing doctoral studies in communication at the University of Macau – specialising in socio-linguistics, discourse studies and new communication perspectives based on local culture and great Asian traditions such as Buddhism.